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Switch and save with heat pump rebates

Make the switch to an electric heat pump powered by water with rebates from BC Hydro and CleanBC.

Looking to install a heat pump? Rebates from BC Hydro, CleanBC and the federal government can help you switch and save. Rebate amounts vary depending on whether your home is currently heated by electricity or another type of fuel.

Rebates to switch from natural gas, oil or propane

If your home's current main heating source is natural gas, oil or propane, you could get up to $11,000 in rebates for making the switch to an electric heat pump. This includes a $3,000 BC Hydro rebate in addition to CleanBC’s existing $3,000 rebate. This means eligible applicants can receive a combined rebate of up to $6,000 from BC Hydro and CleanBC in one application while funding lasts.

See full rebate eligibility details for switching from fossil fuels to an electric heat pump.

You may also be eligible for up to $5,000 in rebates from the federal government’s Canada Greener Homes Grant*, and additional top-up rebates from your municipality. This is a separate program with its own eligibility criteria and application process, which requires registration and a home evaluation before making any upgrades. Note: The Canada Greener Homes Grant program is currently experiencing delays in processing registrations for home evaluations, which may delay your heat pump installation if you choose to apply for that grant.

Rebates for homes heated by electricity

You could be eligible for up to $7,000 in combined rebates for installing a heat pump from BC Hydro’s Home Renovation Rebate program and the federal government. Did you know heat pumps are 300% more efficient than electric baseboard heaters? This means you’ll see significant savings on your heating bill, plus get the additional benefit of efficient cooling.

See full heat pump rebate eligibility details for homes currently heated by electricity.

Determining how your home's currently heated

Not sure if your home is heated by electricity or another fuel type? Here are some tips to help you determine:

  • If you currently have baseboard heaters (these are located at the bottom of a wall, typically under windows), your home is heated by electricity.

  • If you have a furnace, an easy way to determine whether it’s gas or electric is to read the label for indication of the fuel type. Can’t see the label? A gas furnace has venting from the top of it, while an electric furnace doesn’t.

  • If you rely on propane or oil for heating, you likely have a propane or oil tank on your property that requires regular refilling.

Find a qualified contractor

A program registered contractor can help you understand the best options for your heat pump installation. Start early, as it may take some time to connect with a contractor due to the growing popularity of heat pumps.